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Canada’s housing crisis is a public health emergency Canada’s housing crisis is a public health emergency
By Tim Richter

All Canadians deserve safe, decent and affordable housing, but for some, the lack of housing is a matter of life and death.

Canada’s housing crisis is a public health emergency Canada’s housing crisis is a public health emergency
By Tim Richter

Canada’s homelessness crisis is the direct result of the federal withdrawal from housing investment.

Canada’s housing crisis is a public health emergency Canada’s housing crisis is a public health emergency
By Ryan Meili

One of the biggest factors that determine whether people will stay healthy or wind up needing emergency or chronic medical care is where they live.

Canada's housing crisis is a public health emergency Canada’s housing crisis is a public health emergency
By Ryan Meili

People without access to stable housing are at higher risk of illness, and their likelihood of recovering well from that illness is greatly diminished.

Canada’s housing crisis is a public health emergency Canada’s housing crisis is a public health emergency
By Ryan Meili

More than 235,000 Canadians experience homelessness at some point every year, whether they sleep in shelters, on the street, couch surf, or wait in hospital.

Re-thinking care for Canada’s aging population Re-thinking care for Canada’s aging population
By Dr. Marcus Hollander

Despite all the hype, the aging population adds a little less than one percent to the cost of healthcare per year.

Re-thinking care for Canada’s aging population Re-thinking care for Canada’s aging population
By Dr. Marcus Hollander

The major increase in costs for our healthcare system comes from wage increases, the use of new and more expensive technologies and other factors, but not as a result of an aging population.

Re-thinking care for Canada’s aging population Re-thinking care for Canada’s aging population
By Dr. Neena Chappell

Our health system is designed for a younger population and to treat acute illnesses. Yes we have an aging population that suffers primarily from chronic conditions best treated under a home care model.

Do we really need an expanded CPP? Do we really need an expanded CPP?
By Dr. Robert Brown

Fewer workers today than a half-century ago have workplace pensions…and, clearly, Canadians are not filling the void with increased personal savings. Instead, they take on ever-increasing levels of debt.

Do we really need an expanded CPP? Do we really need an expanded CPP?
By Dr. Robert Brown

According to the evidence, a significant proportion of future Canadian retirees are going to suffer measurable deterioration in their standards of living.


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