David JuurlinkDr. Juurlink is a staff internist and head of the division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto. He is also a medical toxicologist at the Ontario Poison Centre at the Hospital for Sick Children and a scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences.

He received degrees in Pharmacy (1990) and Medicine (1994) from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and completed postgraduate training in Internal Medicine (1998) followed by residency in Clinical Pharmacology (2000), a fellowship in Medical Toxicology (2002), and a PhD in Clinical Epidemiology (2003), all at the University of Toronto. He has received certification from the American Board of Internal Medicine, the American Board of Emergency Medicine (Medical Toxicology), and the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology.

He is presently the Sunnybrook site director for the program in Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology and is actively involved with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons subspecialty program in Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology as a member of the Nucleus committee and Vice Chair of the Examinations committee.

In addition to his clinical, teaching, and administrative activities, Dr. Juurlink maintains an active research program in the field of drug safety. His areas of particular interest include drug safety, adverse drug events, the consequences of drug-drug interactions in clinical practice, and the epidemiology of suicide and deliberate self-poisoning.

Download a Hi-Res Photo of David Juurlink

Commentaries by Dr. David Juurlink:

Facing some unpleasant truths about opioids // Regarder en face certaines vérités désagréables sur les opioids 
Canada slow to respond to prescription opioid crisis
 // Le Canada tarde à réagir à
la crise des opioïdes d’ordonnance
Prescription drug addiction is a major public health crisis

Podcasts by Dr. David Juurlink:

Understanding the opioids crisis in Canada

Posters by Dr. David Juurlink:

Canada slow to respond to prescription opioid crisis

“For patient safety, every doctor and pharmacist should have real-time access to a patient’s full medication profile, as has been the case in British Columbia for almost two decades.”

Read the commentary: Canada slow to respond to prescription opioid crisis

 

 

 

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“Drug companies should be compelled to conduct large-scale evaluations of the benefits and risks of their drugs, rather than small studies aimed at getting their products to market.”

Read the commentary: Canada slow to respond to prescription opioid crisis

 

 

 

 

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“Well-intentioned prescribing fueled the opioid crisis. For 20 years now, doctors have prescribed opioids — drugs like oxycodone, hydromorphone and others — far too liberally for chronic pain.”

Read the commentary: Facing some unpleasant truth about opioids

 

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“Despite the best of intentions, doctors flooded North American homes with opioid drugs purer and often stronger than heroin.”

Read the commentary: Facing some unpleasant truth about opioids

 

 

juurlinkposter4sept26-16“To openly question the role of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain is to draw the ire of patients and, sometimes, the displeasure of colleagues, particularly those who specialize in pain medicine. But it is long past time that doctors and patients reflect on what happens when these drugs are prescribed for months or years at a time.”

Read the commentary: Facing some unpleasant truth about opioids

juurlinkposter5sept26-16“The goal of pain medication isn’t simply pain relief, the goal is to help more than harm. Sometimes chronic opioid therapy meets this objective, but it does so less often than we think.”

Read the commentary: Facing some unpleasant truth about opioids

 

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“The opioid epidemic is the greatest drug safety crisis of our time. Addressing it involves facing some unpleasant truths and asking some difficult questions.”

Read the commentary: Facing some unpleasant truth about opioids

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