Kimberlyn McGrail is an Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia, associate director of the UBC Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, a senior researcher with Statistics Canada and an associate with the Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation.

Kim’s current research interests are in variations in health care services use and outcomes, aging and the use of health care services and understanding health care as a determinant of health. She has worked on projects with provincial and federal policy- and decision-makers, including the BC Ministry of Health Services, the Health Council of Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Kim was the 2009-10 Commonwealth Fund Harkness Associate in Health Care Policy and Practice. She holds a PhD in Health Care and Epidemiology from the University of British Columbia, and a Master’s in Public Health from the University of Michigan.

Download a new hi-res photo of Kimberlyn McGrail

Commentaries by Dr. Kimberlyn McGrail:

BC fails to improve primary healthcare after more than a billion dollar investment
Don’t blame aging boomers
Innovate, co-operate to improve health services for Canadians
Premiers’ priority should be home and community care // Des différences importantes dans les services de soins communautaires et à domicile d’un bout à l’autre du pays

Videos by Dr. Kimberlyn McGrail:

What’s driving up our health care costs?

Posters by Dr. Kimberlyn McGrail:

BC fails to improve primary healthcare after more than a billion dollar investment

“A growing body of research suggests incentive payments to doctors are not a reliable way to improve the quality of health care.”

Read the commentary: BC fails to improve primary healthcare after more than a billion dollar investment

 

 

 

 

What’s driving up our health care costs?

“One of the greatest myths we have in health care is that our aging society is the big culprit of increases in health expenditures. Increased utilization of specialist care and diagnostic services across all ages are driving up costs.”

Watch the video: What’s driving up our health care costs? With Kimberlyn McGrail (3.2 min)

 

 

 

British Columbia’s failed healthcare experiment

“Even patients with a family doctor often resort to emergency departments and walk-in clinics because less than a third of BC doctors report having any other arrangements for after-hours care.”

Read the commentary: British Columbia’s failed healthcare experiment

 

British Columbia’s failed healthcare experiment

“Before spending billions more, we need to agree on what success in health care looks like, and monitor progress from the start.”

Read the commentary: British Columbia’s failed healthcare experiment

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