Dr. Robert McMurtry is a graduate of the University of Toronto in Medicine and a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

In 1987, he was appointed Professor and Chair of Surgery at the University of Calgary and Chief of Surgery at Foothills Hospital in Calgary, Alberta (Canada). In 1992, he became Dean of Medicine at the University of Western Ontario and subsequently Dean of Medicine and Dentistry, a post he held until 1999. In 1999, he became the first Cameron Visiting Chair at Health Canada – a post carrying the responsibility for providing policy advice to the Deputy Minister and Minister of Health for Canada.

He was appointed to the Romanow Commission in 2002 as a Special Advisor to Commissioner Romanow.

Dr. McMurtry is currently Professor of Surgery at the University of Western Ontario and Orthopedic Consultant at the Hand and Upper Limb Centre. His work involves an active clinical practice as well as teaching and research. In October of 2003, he was appointed to the Transition Advisory Board of the incoming Provincial Government of Ontario.

He was appointed to the Health Council of Canada from 2003 to 2007. He chaired the Wait Times and Accessibility Work Group from January 2004 to January 2006. He also maintains active memberships in the Canadian Index of Wellbeing Project Management Team, as well as the Alberta Bone and Joint Health Institute.

Download a new hi-res photo of Robert McMurtry

Commentaries by Dr. Robert McMurtry:

Canada has mixed wait time results in healthcare
Putting healthcare on the federal election agenda
Patient-centred healthcare could reduce wait times and improve the Canadian health system // Les soins axés sur le patient pourraient réduire les temps d’attente et améliorer le système de santé au Canada
Why our health system works for Canada

Posters by Dr. Robert McMurtry:

McMurtryPosterJun06.14

“We must be clear about the implications of those who seek to commodify health care; it is a matter of social justice that care should always be based on need and not ability to pay.”

Read the commentary: Why our health system works for Canada

 

 

 

 

McMurtryPosterMay20.15

“Sadly, little, if any, progress has been made in the intervening 12 plus years since Romanow — and certainly not in the area of accountability, a sticking point for many Canadians.” Dr. Robert Y. McMurtry, University of Manitoba

Read the commentary: Putting healthcare on the federal election agenda

 

 

 

Canada has mixed wait time results in healthcare

“Best practices not only enhance healthcare efficiency, they result in substantial economic savings too — a minimum of 15 percent according to most analyses.”

Read the Commentary: Canada has mixed wait time results in healthcare

 

 

Putting healthcare on the federal election agenda“While the principles in healthcare of Universality, comprehensiveness, accessibility, portability and public administration continue to resonate with Canadians, we must maintain a constant vigilance of Medicare’s performance.”

Read the commentary: Putting healthcare on the federal election agenda

 

Putting healthcare on the federal election agenda“For a healthcare system to continue to serve Canadians into the future, continued vigilance and progressive change with cost constraint must be attractive to policy and decision makers.  Now it’s time we heard what our political parties plan to do for Medicare.”

Read the commentary: Putting healthcare on the federal election agenda

 

Canada has mixed wait time results in healthcare
“In addition to timely health care, we must also establish a clear rationale for treatment in the first place.  When, why and how interventions need to be undertaken should be re-examined across the country.”

Read the commentary: Canada has mixed wait time results in healthcare

 

Canada has mixed wait time results in healthcare“Building on the successes of best practices already established in some regions of Canada should set the agenda for the future – to enhance healthcare efficiency and quality of care at lower costs.”

Read the commentary: Canada has mixed wait time results in healthcare

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