Tag Archives: Canada’s healthcare system

There’s nothing like an American health care debate to make Canadians feel lucky There’s nothing like an American health care debate to make Canadians feel lucky
By Danielle Martin

There’s nothing like an American health care debate to make Canadians feel lucky.

When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing
By Colleen Flood

Canadians don’t like to hear this, but when it comes to pharmaceuticals, our health insurance system has plenty in common with the United States – and that’s not a good thing

When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing
By Colleen Flood

Many Canadians have no drug insurance whatsoever and one in five Canadians now report that someone in their household is not taking their prescription medicine due to concerns about costs.

Canada needs a comprehensive strategy to improve prescription drug safety for seniors Canada needs a comprehensive strategy to improve prescription drug safety for seniors
By Nicole F. Bernier

Four years ago, at age 84, my dad survived a severe stroke. The downside is that during his hospital stay this otherwise fit person was put on a drug regimen and has been taking nine prescription drugs a day ever since.

When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing
By Colleen Flood

Most Canadians would likely agree that those who need potentially life-saving prescription medications should have ready access to them.

Academics need to make sure their evidence matters Academics need to make sure their evidence matters
By Kathleen O’Grady and Noralou Roos

An average paper in a peer-reviewed academic journal is read by no more than 10 people, according to Singapore-based academic, Asit Biswas, and Oxford-researcher, Julian Kirchherr, in their controversial commentary, “Prof, no one is reading you,” which went viral last year.

Reforming healthcare funding to address the needs of our aging population Reforming healthcare funding to address the needs of our aging population
By Réjean Hébert

Funding home care and long-term care is fast becoming the main challenge of our outdated medicare system — a system developed in the mid-twentieth century for a young population that mostly required acute care from hospitals and physicians.

What kind of health workforce will be needed to serve our aging population?
By Gregory Huyer and Ivy Lynn Bourgeault

We know that Canada’s population is aging. Among the many statistics that have been reported is how in 2015, the proportion of Canadian seniors surpassed that of youth under 15 for the first time. The gap will continue to widen over the next 20 years.

Time to re-think health care policy for the elderly
By Neena Chappell and Marcus J. Hollander

As the Canadian population continues to age, there is a need to revisit conventional thinking regarding the provision of health care services for seniors to ensure that the system is sustainable for all Canadians. There are a number of misperceptions in current thinking.

Stemming the tide of death after release from jails and prisons in Canada
By Fiona Kouyoumdjian and Stephen Hwang

The tragic stories of Ashley Smith, Edward Snowshoe and other inmates who have died while in Canadian correctional facilities have rightly made headlines around the country.


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