Economics

Four ways you could save money on your prescription medications

As Canadians, we are proud of our universal healthcare system, which provides publicly-funded essential doctor and hospital care based on need and not ability to pay. Unfortunately, our health system falls short when it comes to prescription medication.

When it comes to health care funding in Canada, we should stop living in the past

How much should the federal government pay towards health care costs? Hardly a week goes by without this thorny issue being disputed between federal and provincial governments.

What medicines do we really need in Canada?

Surveys and polls often show Canadians are proud of our universal health system, which provides publicly funded care for doctor and hospital services. Canadians don’t have to worry about filing for bankruptcy to get care for themselves or their families when they need it.

Why workers over 65 years of age should be entitled to employer health plans too

Imagine having your private health insurance — dental, vision, prescription drug, life, travel and disability coverage — suddenly terminated by your employer at age 65 while you’re still working for them, and just when you may really need it.

When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing

Most Canadians would likely agree that those who need potentially life-saving prescription medications should have ready access to them.

Why private health insurance coverage in Canada needs a review

Last week, the media carried a story about a nine-year-old boy in New Brunswick who was denied private health coverage because of his weight (at 5 foot 2 inches and 135 pounds). His family were shocked – as were many reading the story – that a child could be denied private health coverage in Canada.