Dr. Colleen M. Flood is a Research Chair in Health Law and Policy at the University of Ottawa. She is the former Scientific Director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Institute of Health Services and Policy Research. She is also an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Toronto and is cross-appointed into the Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation and the School of Public Policy.

Professor Flood obtained her B.A. and LL.B. (Honours) from the University of Auckland, New Zealand and her LL.M. and SJD from the University of Toronto, Canada. Her primary area of scholarship is in comparative health care policy, public/private financing of health care systems, health care reform, and accountability and governance issues more broadly. She has been consulted on comparative health policy and governance issues by both the Senate Social Affairs Committee studying health care in Canada and by the Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada (the Romanow Commission).

Download a hi-res photo of Colleen Flood

Commentaries by Colleen Flood:

When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing
Canadians should modernize not privatize medicare
 // Modernisons le régime de santé public, au lieu de le privatiser
Four things you should know about the pending Charter challenge against medicare

Federal government moves to strip power from top public health scientist // Le gouvernement fédéral s’apprête à dépouiller de ses pouvoirs l’administrateur en chef de la santé publique 
Why Canada shouldn’t compete with the U.S. for the worse performing health system in the developed world // Pourquoi le Canada devrait éviter de faire concurrence aux États-Unis pour le pire système de santé de tous les pays développés
Why medical tourism is not the answer // Plutôt qu’une vache à lait, une hydre à plusieurs têtes
Time for Canada to improve its healthcare performance
Wrestling with Big Pharma

Podcast with Colleen Flood:

Audio Podcast: A Supreme Court Case that Could Change the Face of the Canadian Health Care System, with Colleen Flood 

Posters by Colleen Flood:

Why Canada shouldn’t compete with the U.S. for the worst performing health system in the developed world

“Our health system fails to offer universal (public) coverage for prescription drugs, unlike the coverage provided in nearly every other developed country in the world.”

Read the commentary: Why Canada shouldn’t compete with the U.S. for the worst performing health system in the developed world

 

 

 

Pourquoi le Canada devrait éviter de faire concurrence aux États-Unis pour le pire système de santé de tous les pays développés

« Notre système de santé n’assure pas une couverture universelle (publique) des médicaments sur ordonnance, contrairement à presque tous les autres pays développés du monde. »

Lisez l’article : Pourquoi le Canada devrait éviter de faire concurrence aux États-Unis pour le pire système de santé de tous les pays développés

 

 

 

Why Canada shouldn’t compete with the U.S. for the worst performing health system in the developed world

“Canadians have their health needs covered by the public system only 70% of the time, much less than the UK (84%) or Norway (85%) or France (77%).”

Read the commentary: Why Canada shouldn’t compete with the U.S. for the worst performing health system in the developed world

 

 

 

Pourquoi le Canada devrait éviter de faire concurrence aux États-Unis pour le pire système de santé de tous les pays développés

« Les besoins en matière de soins de santé des Canadiens sont couverts par le système public dans une proportion de 70 % seulement, ce qui est très inférieur à ce que l’on constate au Royaume-Uni (84 %), en Norvège (85 %) et en France (77 %). »

Lisez l’article : Pourquoi le Canada devrait éviter de faire concurrence aux États-Unis pour le pire système de santé de tous les pays développés

 

 

 

Why Canada shouldn’t compete with the U.S. for the worst performing health system in the developed world

“Instead of having Canada’s health system compete with the United States for last place, we could start by looking at the expansive policies of European systems that include drug coverage, home care and long-term care.”

Read the commentary: Why Canada shouldn’t compete with the U.S. for the worst performing health system in the developed world

 

 

 

Pourquoi le Canada devrait éviter de faire concurrence aux États-Unis pour le pire système de santé de tous les pays développés

« Plutôt que de laisser notre régime de santé entrer en concurrence avec le système américain pour la dernière place, nous pourrions commencer par examiner les politiques des systèmes européens, qui englobent l’assurance médicaments, les soins à domicile et les soins de longue durée. »

Lisez l’article : Pourquoi le Canada devrait éviter de faire concurrence aux États-Unis pour le pire système de santé de tous les pays développés

 

 

FloodPoster1.Apr25.14

“Medical tourism looks at first like a cash cow, but it is more like a many-headed Hydra.”

Read the commentary: Why medical tourism is not the answer

 

 

 

 

 

Plutôt qu’une vache à lait, une hydre à plusieurs têtes

“Plutôt qu’une vache à lait, le tourisme médical est une hydre à plusieurs têtes.”

Lisez l’article : Plutôt qu’une vache à lait, une hydre à plusieurs têtes

 

 

 

 

 

FloodPoster3.Apr25.14

“If our governments, hospitals and physicians can promise excellent and timely care to tourists from other countries, there’s no reason why the same promise can’t be made to all Canadians.”

Read the commentary: Why medical tourism is not the answer

 

 

 

 

FloodPoster2.May06.14

“Privatization of health services to remedy wait times is only a solution for those who can afford to pay.”

Read the commentary: Why medical tourism is not the answer

 

 

 

 

 

Four things you should know about the pending Charter challenge against medicare

“Isn’t it long past time our governments and our doctors work to ensure all Canadians – and not just those who can afford to pay – receive timely care?”

Read the Commentary: Four things you should know about the pending Charter challenge against medicare

 

 

 

 

When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing

“Many Canadians have no drug insurance whatsoever and one in five Canadians now report that someone in their household is not taking their prescription medicine due to concerns about costs.”

Read the Commentary: When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing

 

When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing

“Canadians don’t like to hear this, but when it comes to pharmaceuticals, our health insurance system has plenty in common with the United States – and that’s not a good thing.”

Read the Commentary: When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing

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