Neena L. Chappell, PhD, FRSC, holds a Canada Research Chair in Social Gerontology and is a Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of Victoria. Dr. Chappell was founding Director of the Centre on Aging at the University of Manitoba (1982 – 1992) and first Director of the Centre on Aging at the University of Victoria (1992 – 2002), developing both into world-class research facilities while ensuring accessibility to the community.

For over 30 years, she has been conducting gerontological research, focusing on issues around care giving, social support, dementia care, health services, health care policy, and healthy aging, in the West and in China. Dr. Chappell promotes the integration of relevance and scientific rigour. She has published more than 300 academic articles, chapters and reports. She has published 9 books including two edited. She is currently president of the Canadian Association on Gerontology and president elect of Academy II (Social Sciences) of the Royal Society of Canada.

Download a Hi-Res Photo of Neena Chappell

Commentaries by Dr. Neena Chappell:

Time to re-think health care policy for the elderly
We can sustain our health care system – here’s how // Nous pouvons maintenir notre système de soins de santé : voici comment

Interviews with Dr. Neena Chappell:

Audio Podcast: Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada
Audio Podcast: Will Senior Care in Canada Break the Bank?
Audio Podcast: Re-thinking care for Canada’s aging population
Audio Podcast: Time to re-think health care policy for the elderly

Posters by Dr. Neena Chappell:

Will senior care in Canada break the bank?

“We have to integrate homecare within a more flexible funding system so that people can be kept at home if they choose — and receive the care they need.”

Listen to the Podcast: Will senior care in Canada break the bank?

 

 

 

 

Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

Often what seniors need to stay in their homes longer are services that provide social care rather than medical care.  We are not very good at funding these services even though they are cheaper to provide.

Listen to the Podcast: Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

 

Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

Old people — just like all the rest of us — don’t want to end up in an institution.  We want to stay in our home when we need care.

Listen to the Podcast: Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

 

 

Re-thinking care for Canada’s aging population

Our health system is designed for a younger population and to treat acute illnesses. Yes we have an aging population that suffers primarily from chronic conditions best treated under a home care model.

Read the commentary: Re-thinking care for Canada’s aging population

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