Noralou Roos

Noralou RoosNoralou P. Roos received her PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1968. In 1972 she received the Sears‑Roebuck Foundation Federal Faculty Fellow, and moved to the University of Manitoba in 1973. She joined the Population Health Group at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research in 1988. Noralou was a co-Founder of the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy. She headed the group which received Canadian Foundation for Innovation funding to create Canada’s first data laboratory, containing population based data on health, education and social services and held a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair. Citations to Dr. Roos’ work place her among the top 100 Canadian scientists according to The Institute of Scientific Information.

She was a member of the Prime Minister’s National Forum on Health, the Interim Governing Council setting up the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), received the Order of Canada in 2005, was elected a member of the Academy of Sciences of the Royal Society of Canada (2009), and most recently received a Fellowship in the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. Noralou led the Canadian Drug Policy Development Coalition working with Health Canada and the provinces which resulted in the funding of the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN) at CIHR. She has also been working with community groups, business and government to bring research on ‘At-Risk’ kids to the policy table; she is a Member of the United Way of Winnipeg Board of Trustees, the Winnipeg Poverty Reduction Council (Strengthening the Core Working Group), and a Member of the Point Douglas/Lord Selkirk Park Project Advisory Board.

Dr. Roos has been Nominated for the Seventeenth Annual NIHCM Foundation Health Care Research Award for the article entitled “Enhancing Policymakers’ Understanding of Disparities: Relevant Data from an Information-Rich Environment.” (co-authors: Leslie L Roos, Marni Brownell and Emma Fuller, University of Western Australia), has received the Inaugural Population and Public Health Research Milestone Award, CIHR and CPHA, and in 2010, gave the Emmett Hall Memorial Lecture, one of Canada’s most prestigious lectureships, which commemorates the father of Canadian Medicare with an annual address at the Canadian Association for Health Services and Policy Research Conference.

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Commentaries by Dr. Noralou Roos:

Academics need to make sure their evidence matters // Faire le lien entre la recherche universitaire, le public et les décideurs politiques
The time for a Guaranteed Annual Income might finally have come // Serions-nous enfin mûrs pour le revenu annuel garanti?
Five things most people get wrong about Canada’s healthcare system // Cinq faits généralement méconnus sur le système de soins de santé canadien
Seeing clearly // Voir clairement
Canadians care about healthcare – so why don’t we see more health media coverage?
Beware drug store dispensing fees
Making patients pay won’t make our health system more affordable
Providing the right amount of healthcare // Prodiguer la bonne quantité de soins de santé
Silver tsunamni to break the health system’s bank? // Les personnes âgées ne constituent pas une menace pour le système de santé canadien

Videos by Dr. Noralou Roos:

Making evidence matter: The founding of EvidenceNetwork.ca and why it’s more important than ever

Podcast with Dr. Noraloo Roos:

Giving healthcare experts a voice in the mainstream media

News about Dr. Noraloo Roos:

Noralou Roos Order of Canada

Dr. Noralou Roos was named an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2016 for her years of service and work in health policy.

 

 

 

 

 

Posters by Dr. Noralou Roos:

Seeing healthcare clearly

“It’s critical that the quality of medical care in Canada is top notch, but it’s equally important that care be delivered in ways that are sensitive to individual, family and cultural needs, and delivered with a human touch.”

Read the commentary: Seeing healthcare clearly

 

 

 

 

Voir clairement

« Il est essentiel que les soins de santé soient de première qualité au Canada, mais il est également important qu’ils soient offerts selon des modalités adaptées aux besoins particuliers des personnes et des familles et tenant compte de la diversité culturelle des patients, avec une touche d’humanité. »

Lisez l’article : Voir clairement

 

 

 

Seeing healthcare clearly

“I hope as we move forward on the perpetual path to reform healthcare in this country — shortening wait times, improving access, enhancing quality — that we keep in mind it’s pretty good to begin with.”

Read the commentary: Seeing healthcare clearly

 

 

 

 

Voir clairement

« Alors que nous poursuivons sur la voie d’une perpétuelle réforme de notre système de soins de santé afin de réduire les temps d’attente, améliorer l’accès et rehausser la qualité des soins, j’espère que nous ne perdrons jamais de vue le fait que, d’entrée de jeu, nous avons un très bon système. »

Lisez l’article : Voir clairement

 

 

 

Five things most people get wrong about Canada’s healthcare system

Five facts about the Canadian health care system

1. Doctors are self-employed, not government employees
2. Canada has 15 different health care systems, not just one
3. Funded health care services are not provided equally across the country
4. User fees charged to patients are not permitted
5. Canadians are as likely to hold private health insurance as Americans

Read the commentary: Five things most people get wrong about Canada’s healthcare system

 

RoosPosterAug21.13

“There are costs driving the increase in healthcare spending more than our aging population. Canadians are getting more tests, more treatments and more drugs, some of which may have a positive influence on health while other do very little but increase costs.”

Read the commentary: Silver tsunami to break the health system’s bank?

 

 

 

Les personnes âgées ne constituent pas une menace pour le système de santé canadien

“Il existe d’autres coûts qui contribuent à l’augmentation des dépenses en soins de santé autant que le vieillissement de la population. Nous subissons plus de tests, recevons plus de traitements et consommons plus de médicaments, certains peuvent avoir une influence positive sur la santé tandis que les autres ne font rien d’autre qu’augmenter les coûts.”

Lisez l’article: Les personnes âgées ne constituent pas une menace pour le système de santé canadien

 

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