Canada needs a comprehensive strategy to improve prescription drug safety for seniors

Canada needs a comprehensive strategy to improve prescription drug safety for seniors

Four years ago, at age 84, my dad survived a severe stroke. The downside is that during his hospital stay this otherwise fit person was put on a drug regimen and has been taking nine prescription drugs a day ever since.

Will senior care break the bank?

Will senior care break the bank?

Approximately 20 percent of Canadians are one day going to need some form of high cost, long-term care. We need to have a publicly funded plan in place.

Will senior care in Canada break the bank?

Will senior care in Canada break the bank?

We have to integrate homecare within a more flexible funding system so that people can be kept at home if they choose — and receive the care they need.

From Robyn Tamblyn, Evidence Network’s recent collection of health policy news articles

From Robyn Tamblyn, Evidence Network’s recent collection of health policy news articles

What are the characteristics of health and health care policies that are likely to lead to better health for Canadians and a more effective and less costly health care system?

From David Dodge, What are the characteristics of health and health care policies?

From David Dodge, What are the characteristics of health and health care policies?

What are the characteristics of health and health care policies that are likely to lead to better health for Canadians and a more effective and less costly health care system?

Will senior care break the bank?

Will senior care break the bank?

“Our aging population is going to contribute to an increase in healthcare costs, but it is not going to be the major driver of healthcare spending.” Michael Grignon, Professor, Departments of Economics and Health, Aging & Society, McMaster University Listen to the Podcast: Will senior care in Canada break the bank?        DOWNLOAD […]

Will senior care break the bank?

Will senior care break the bank?

Our aging population is not a tsunami, but a slow moving demographic shift. We have time to prepare but we need to get started

The real costs of informal caregiving in Canada

The real costs of informal caregiving in Canada

The phenomenon is not exactly marginal: according to a recently released government report, one in every three workers in Canada is assisting a chronically disabled person — many of them seniors — with transportation, household maintenance or day-to-day tasks.

Infographic – Ambulance fees are an obstacle on the road to care

Infographic – Ambulance fees are an obstacle on the road to care

Our aging population is going to contribute to an increase in healthcare costs, but it is not going to be the major driver of healthcare spending.

Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

Often what seniors need to stay in their homes longer are services that provide social care rather than medical care. We are not very good at funding these services even though they are cheaper to provide.