Canada needs a comprehensive strategy to improve prescription drug safety for seniors

Canada needs a comprehensive strategy to improve prescription drug safety for seniors

Four years ago, at age 84, my dad survived a severe stroke. The downside is that during his hospital stay this otherwise fit person was put on a drug regimen and has been taking nine prescription drugs a day ever since.

Will senior care in Canada break the bank?

Will senior care in Canada break the bank?

We have to integrate homecare within a more flexible funding system so that people can be kept at home if they choose — and receive the care they need.

The real costs of informal caregiving in Canada

The real costs of informal caregiving in Canada

The phenomenon is not exactly marginal: according to a recently released government report, one in every three workers in Canada is assisting a chronically disabled person — many of them seniors — with transportation, household maintenance or day-to-day tasks.

Pros and cons of an expanded Canada Pension Plan

Pros and cons of an expanded Canada Pension Plan

The Conservative government has announced it would like to have a dialogue with Canadians about a potential expansion of the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). While this, in itself, is a purely political action — since it commits the government to nothing — it is worth looking at what the possible outcomes might be.

Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

Often what seniors need to stay in their homes longer are services that provide social care rather than medical care. We are not very good at funding these services even though they are cheaper to provide.

Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

Old people — just like all the rest of us — don’t want to end up in an institution. We want to stay in our home when we need care.

Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

Most people hope to be able to age in their own home. But seniors and their families don’t always have that choice. Four health care policy experts, Dr. Ivy Bourgeault, Dr. Robyn Tamblyn, Dr. Neena Chappell and Dr. Michel Grignon, believe it is time to rethink the philosophy behind long term care in Canada.