After many years of success, EvidenceNetwork.ca is no longer in operation. We would like to thank everyone who has contributed to the organization over the past decade including our dedicated researchers, newspaper editors, readers and funders. However, now it is time to move onto new ways of looking at knowledge mobilization and policy. Should you have any questions, please feel free to contact Shannon Sampert at s.sampert@uwinnipeg.ca.

Three nutrition trends to stay away from — based on the best evidence

If you follow health tips in the media, you’d think the nutritional sciences are a mess: Is butter good for you or is it bad? Should I eat breakfast or skip it? Should I eat like a caveman? Or maybe should I eat more like a bird?

When it comes to prescription drug coverage, our health system has plenty in common with the United States — and that’s not a good thing

Most Canadians would likely agree that those who need potentially life-saving prescription medications should have ready access to them.

Reforming healthcare funding to address the needs of our aging population

Funding home care and long-term care is fast becoming the main challenge of our outdated medicare system — a system developed in the mid-twentieth century for a young population that mostly required acute care from hospitals and physicians.

What kind of health workforce will be needed to serve our aging population?

We know that Canada’s population is aging. Among the many statistics that have been reported is how in 2015, the proportion of Canadian seniors surpassed that of youth under 15 for the first time. The gap will continue to widen over the next 20 years.

We must speak for those who can’t

On June 6, the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision making physician-hastened death legal will come into effect. A parliamentary committee asked to help the government plot how that would roll out in Canada has made some far-reaching recommendations, well beyond what was contemplated by the court in Carter v. Canada.

These ten medical expenses could give you a tax break

As Canadians we like to take pride in our publicly funded healthcare system, but the truth is many of us — especially those with or caring for someone with disabilities or chronic conditions — pay out of pocket for a wide range of essential health services.