Backgrounder: Making Sense of the U.S. Health Care System: A Primer

The U.S. health care system is not a universally accessible system – it is a publicly and privately-funded patchwork of fragmented systems and programs. Insured Americans are covered by both public and private health insurance, with a majority covered by private insurance plans through their employers.

Why more healthcare is not always the answer

Does more healthcare create better outcomes? In other words, do more medications, tests and interventions necessarily result in healthier patients?
It turns out more care is, all too often, unnecessary care.

Rethinking long-term care for seniors in Canada

Most people hope to be able to age in their own home. But seniors and their families don’t always have that choice. Four health care policy experts, Dr. Ivy Bourgeault, Dr. Robyn Tamblyn, Dr. Neena Chappell and Dr. Michel Grignon, believe it is time to rethink the philosophy behind long term care in Canada.

Seeing healthcare clearly

I had cataract surgery last year — a terrifying prospect for a visual person. I love art and ocean views, and I was nervous about anyone working on my eyes. I delayed surgery a couple of times but finally committed. As it turned out, my surgery went fine. In fact, I loved that I could see colours vividly again. Our health system made that happen

Report card on wait times in Canada omits important developments

Canadians might have been inclined to take a sedative for an anxiety attack after reading about the Wait Time Alliance’s (WTA) 2014 report card on waits for medical care in Canada. The WTA gives Canada a failing grade on the structural changes it says are needed to have the timely access to care seen in other countries.